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Meditation

Healing Place Meditation

Healing Place Meditation

Healing place meditation can be done as either a guided (someone else leading the meditation) or self-guided relaxation and visualization practice. Doing healing place meditation during the grieving process can help focus the mind on calming and healing images to bring about beneficial changes in the body and mind. Through the purposeful creation of inner images and mental pictures, a more positive pattern of inner resilience can be created, enhancing an overall sense of well-being.

Observation of the Breath/Mindful Breathing

To prepare for doing a healing place meditation, it can helpful to begin by observing your breathing; this is called mindful breathing or mindful observation of the breath. To begin:

Gently close your eyes. Breathe normally and become aware of the air flowing into your lungs and body. Now, breathe in noticing where the air goes inside the body; breathe out noticing the air leaving the body. Breathe in and out like this several times, observing without judgment the way in which you normally breathe. Allow your breathing to relax you

To calm and body and mind even more, you can begin your healing place meditation by placing your attention on each part of your body, mindfully breathing in and out, and then asking each body part to relax and let go of all tension.

Healing Place Meditation

This guided visualization is a modified version of a safe and healing space meditation found in “Trauma Healing and Transformation” by Patricia Mathes Cane.

Imagine that you are starting on a journey to a very special place at the center of your being. This is your inner refuge, your safe and healing place where only you can enter. Take time to journey to this place and to discover your special refuge.

What is your refuge like? Perhaps it is a garden full of flowers and beautiful trees. Or maybe your refuge is in the mountains, or by a lake, or in a meadow with clear blue sky and passing clouds. Or perhaps your safe space is in a chapel or house. Decide now where you will go to be in your safe and healing place.

Take some time to explore and create this space, filling it with all that will support you and nourish you. Are there colors, sounds, smells, textures that you are aware of? How do you feel in this place? What is it like for you? Take some time now to enjoy your special place. Feel very safe, secure and peaceful. Fill yourself with great peace and a deep sense of safety and security. Take time to open yourself to receive whatever you may need at this moment.

Take a few more moments enjoying your refuge of peace; look around for some image that you can bring back with you to remind you of special refuge.

Return to the Present Moment

Begin now to become aware of your body once again. Breathe deeply and feel the energy of your feet and toes; stretch and flex your feet and toes reawakening them. Silently count from 5 to 1; with each number, feel more and more present in your body.

Five. Breathe deeply. Stretch and flex your legs feeling the energy flowing fully throughout your body.
Four. Stretch and flex the trunk of your body, feel fully alive in your pelvis, your abdomen, your chest and shoulders.
Three. Stretch and flex your arms and hands feeling the energy flowing fully through your arms.
Two. Very gently stretch and flex your neck and facial muscles feeling very alive and relaxed in your head.
One. Breathe deeply and when you are ready open your eyes; feel relaxed, present in the moment where you are. Feel very peaceful and tranquil in all of your being. Take a few moments in silence to reflect on your visit to the refuge of your safe and healing place.  

The healing place meditation can be done for five or more minutes as a purposeful time-out practice. And it can also be done as an inner balance refresher for just a few minutes here and there, throughout the day. You can return to your healing place whenever you feel grief arise, are tired, stressed or in need of a place of inner sanctuary.

Doing a healing place meditation on a regular basis during your period of bereavement can help to encourages body awareness and inner comfort, strengthen the ability to focus and concentrate, and activate your inner healer – the guidance system within you committed to healing the pain of your loss. Consider recording yourself and then listening to your version of your unique healing place meditation; this can foster a sense of empowerment regarding your own ability to get through the challenging terrain of grief.  

Courtesy of Elizabeth Lewis. Read some of Elizabeth Lewis's posts on the Remembering A Life blog.

woman tasting chocolate

Chocolate-tasting Meditation

Looking for the inspiration to meditate? Eating chocolate in the slow, focused way outlined below can help you learn to savor desert, making it less likely that you will eat quickly (eating quickly is often a sign of emotional eating) and can play a role in your meditation practice. Chocolate-tasting meditation uses the senses of taste and smell as sensory anchors or points of focus and can be used as an avenue for relaxation. Purposefully placing your focused attention on one activity as if that activity is the only thing happening in the world allows the mind to rest deeply, even in the midst of activity. If mental chatter or distraction arises while eating, simply go back to focusing on your touchstones/anchors.

  1. Begin by looking at the piece of chocolate deeply.
  2. Bring the chocolate close to your nose and smell it? Note any scents you can identify – vanilla perhaps, cocoa beans – anything else?
  3. Delicately nibble a small portion of the chocolate, bring it into your mouth – in whatever corner of your tongue or palate on which you want to experience it, and allow it to slowly melt.
  4. Continue to do this until the piece of chocolate is gone. Take time to notice other aspects of the experience – the weight of your arm as you lift the chocolate to your tongue; the feel of the chocolate going down your throat. The feel of the mouth as the chocolate is melting. The feel of the mouth once it is empty. The taste in your mouth once the chocolate is gone.
  5. Once the chocolate is gone sit for several moments in silence noticing any thoughts, feelings or changes in the body and mind.
Courtesy of Elizabeth Lewis. Read some of Elizabeth Lewis's posts on the Remembering A Life blog.